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The Though Kitchen - Dedicated to Stirring the Pot

Archive for the Partnerships Category

P.S. Co. x Nau Makers Series: Harding & Wilson

Posted by Alison Wu | July 22nd, 2014 | Filed under Design Eye, Partnerships, Photography
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Peter Lee wearing the Lightbeam Jacket and Altiplano Shirt

Peter Lee is the Co-Founder of Harding & Wilson, a Portland-based brand that creates bow and neck ties from materials sourced in the Pacific Northwest. Whether it is the contrast stitching or the hand-stamped packaging, each tie is handcrafted with attention to detail. Peter and his business partner, Alex Nguyen, blend turn-of-the-century style with their Northwest influence to create a product that can be worn casually or dressed up and that ideally will outlive its original owner being passed along through the generations. P.S. Co. caught up with Peter at his favorite Portland deli, Otto’s, to find out the 5 things he can’t live without, why he believes style and function go hand-in-hand, and where he goes to get away from it all. Check out his answers, here. Purchase one of the Harding & Wilson ties, here.

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Harding & Wilson’s Chinook bow tie and Nau’s Altiplano Shirt

Shop Peter’s favorite items from our Spring/Summer ’14 collection, here.

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Peter’s daily essentials

P.S. Co. x Nau Makers Series: Kiriko

Posted by Alison Wu | June 26th, 2014 | Filed under Design, Partnerships, Photography
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Dawn Yanagihara in the Kiriko studio.

We’re teaming up with Portland Supply Co. to feature a local Portland creative each month this summer through the P.S. Co. x Nau Makers Series. This collaboration aims to highlight the work of a Portland maker while gaining insight into their inspirations and what they love. First up: Dawn Yanagihara of Kiriko.

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The Uncommoners: Meet the Ambassador of Food

Posted by leighann | March 12th, 2014 | Filed under Partnerships, Positive Change, Sustainability, Who We Are

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Last month, we asked for nominations for our next Uncommoner. Submissions poured in: tool makers, bike builders, community organizers, milliners, compost cultivators. The choice was difficult. But after careful consideration, we’d like to introduce you to our newest Uncommoner. She’s an entrepreneur, teacher, food advocate, and Board member of Slow Food USA working at the crossroads of policy, education, and food sovereignty to change the way we eat. And she makes one mean cabbage dish. Meet Katherine Deumling, the Ambassador of Food and brainchild behind Cook With What You Have.
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Meet the venerable Jun Kang, Nau’s new President

Posted by leighann | February 12th, 2014 | Filed under Partnerships, Who We Are

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You might have heard; we’ve been eating a lot of Korean food lately. We’ve also been busy celebrating the year of the Blue Horse with a spacious new office, beautiful spring line, and—yes—even new owners. The Korean-based, outdoor brand, Black Yak and Nau have officially tied the knot.  

This week in the Thought Kitchen, we’re honored to sit down with  Jun Suk Kang, Nau’s new President, to find out what’s ahead for Nau and Black Yak, what’s going to change, and what he thinks about being voted one of Portland Monthly magazine’s most fascinating dinner guests.
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The Uncommoners: Exploring the Other Side of Ordinary

Posted by leighann | October 29th, 2013 | Filed under Design, Partnerships, Who We Are

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We all know them, those friends who work behind-the-scenes, who fly under the radar while doing extraordinary things. They build stuff. They make things. They grow goods. And they do it quietly without the need for accolades or recognition. They’re our friends and neighbors. They’re the humble warriors who live their passion everyday and create positive change. They’re people like Katy Anderson. Known by some as the Lady Carpenter, Katy—as her moniker suggests—is a skilled craftswoman in a man’s world. She’s also the first portrait in The Uncommoners, our new Off-The-Grid series dedicated to exploring the other side of ordinary.
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Nau Waypoints – Ohiopyle Falls

Posted by Alison Wu | October 17th, 2013 | Filed under Partnerships, Photography, Travel

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  PROJECT: Waypoints – Scenic Overlooks LOCATION: Ohiopyle State Park, PA SUBJECT: Ohiopyle Falls

Here are a few more scenic overlooks to add to our why-haven’t-we-been-here list. Thanks to our fall partnership with Yonder Journal, we have peeked over the edge of some of the most awe-inspiring and hidden overlooks in the US. This week they take us to Ohiopyle Falls (and a few stops along the way). To follow this journey and those to come, join us on Instagram (@nauclothing) as we share photos coupled with historical and geographical notes from the field.

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Yonder Journal + Nau: Waypoints Project

Posted by Alison Wu | September 11th, 2013 | Filed under Partnerships, Photography, Travel

We’re going on a two-month adventure with Yonder Journal. It’s a journey that will take us back in time and across the country to peek over the edge of some of the most iconic and hidden overlooks, also known as “Waypoints”. Join us in the Thought Kitchen each week for in-depth briefs, and follow us on Instagram (@nauclothing) daily as we share photos coupled with historical and geographical notes from the field.

LOCATION: Mather Point Scenic Overlook – Grand Canyon

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Field Notes: Weather in the Grand Canyon varies according to elevation. The forested rim is high enough to receive winter snowfall while along the Colorado River path of the inner gorge temperatures are similar to those found in Tucson and other low-elevation Arizona desert locations. Conditions in the Grand Canyon region are generally dry with substantial precipitation occurring twice annually. These follow seasonal pattern shifts in winter (when Pacific storms usually deliver widespread, moderate rain and high-elevation snow to the region from the west) and in late summer (due to North American monsoons), which deliver waves of moisture from the southeast causing dramatic localized thunderstorms fueled by high daytime temperatures. Average annual precipitation on the South Rim is less than 16 inches (35 cm) with an average of 60 inches (132 cm) of snow.

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Nau Takes NYC By Bike

Photo: Lavish Livez Instagram

To commemorate bike month, we took a small group of friends on a curated bike tour from Manhattan to Brooklyn. Each stop along the way brought to life our unique perspective on sustainability, craftsmanship and the modern, mobile lifestyle. Here’s a quick glimpse into our pedal-perfect day.

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We started at HUB in the West Village where we were each fit with our custom Dutch-inspired Brooklyn Cruisers. While the week’s sunny weather had taken a turn, it only added to the spirit of the tour. Most of us simply put on an extra layer with a Dose Jacket or Motil Trench, and we were on our way.

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Engineering the Perfect Ski: An Interview with Pete Wagner

Posted by leighann | January 8th, 2013 | Filed under Design, Outdoor Sport, Partnerships

Courtesy of Wagner Custom Skis

How do you build the perfect ski? All you need is some sugar maple, Kevlar and the world’s most badass computer algorithm. Oh, and you need Pete Wagner, too. The computer-nerd turned ski-craftsman who started Wagner Custom Skis is single-handedly changing the way an industry makes skis. This week in the Thought Kitchen, we sit down with the man behind the planks to learn more about the number cruncher and his coveted custom boards.

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On the Border of Syria: A Dispatch from Mercy Corps

Posted by Guest | January 2nd, 2013 | Filed under Partners for Change, Partnerships, Personal Reflection, Positive Change

Hasna and her seven children fled the civil war in Syria with practically nothing. Mercy Corps-distributed clothes, blankets, mattresses and gas heating supplies will help them through the winter. Photo: Jeremy Barnicle/Mercy Corps

This week in the Thought Kitchen, Jeremy Barnicle, Chief Development and Communications Officer for Mercy Corps, one of our longstanding Partners for Change, travels to Jordan to give us a first hand account of the Syrian refugee crisis and what we can do to help.

Mafraq, Jordan — I am sitting on the floor of a cold, crumbling single room dwelling just on the Jordan side of the Syria-Jordan border.  I’m sipping Turkish coffee, surrounded by a family of Syrian refugees.  The coffee isn’t warming me up much: it is December and it is freezing.

My host is a lady named Hasna Erhael.  She’s a 36 year old mother of seven, six of whom are girls and are sitting with us.  Her oldest child, a 15-year-old boy, is out collecting recyclables to make some money.  Hasna and her family fled Syria a few months ago when their town came under attack by the Syrian army.  Her husband is back in Syria fighting the regime and says he won’t stop until they have taken Damascus.

They came over the border with nothing, and nothing is pretty much what they still have.  They rent this room with help from relatives.  No work.  No school.  No toys or art supplies.  No furniture. No electricity or heat.  No running water.

I don’t want to make Hasna sound like a victim — that’s certainly not how she sees herself.  She tells me she and her family just need to be able to eat a little bit and they’ll be able to hold out until the fighting ends and they can return to Syria. But she is nervous for her girls: “They have nothing to do.  They miss school and they are totally bored.”  They are clearly struggling, and that’s where Mercy Corps comes in.

We are working with a local religious leader to identify Syrian refugees — more than 15,000 of them are hunkered down among the 60,000 permanent resident — and help meet some of their basic needs.  Right now, we have the money to help about 1000 refugee families in Mafraq get prepared for winter: that means we’ve giving them winter coats, blankets, kitchen supplies, food packages, gas heaters and gas.  In general, we are a “hand-up not a hand-out” kind of operation, but in times like this we do our best to bring struggling people some measure of material comfort.  Mercy Corps is providing similar support to Syrian refugees throughout the region.

Mercy Corps is proud to be a partner of Nau.  Support from Nau and its customers allows us to meet the needs of people like Hasna and her family.  For more on our response with Syrian refugees, click here.  

Jeremy Barnicle at the Zataari refugee camp in Jordan. Mercy Corps drilled the well, which will serve all 40-plus thousand Syrian refugees in the camp, plus tens of thousands who live in neighboring communities.